Woolly Worm / Woolly Bear

Woolly_Worm
The Woolly Worm

A Woolly Worm’s properly named a Woolly Bear.
Even so, most folks say you had better beware
winter if you see all-black ones by the dozens.
Black ones do not really count, they’re only cousins!

– – – – – – – –

The Woolly Bear

After winter, the Woolly Bears pupate,
as soon as warmer weather is waking;
Isabella Tiger Moths dot the land.

Whether spring weather is early or late
determines when female moths are laying
and affects the width of Woolly’s brown band.

This band on Woolly Bears we see next Fall
tells us our weather – only last year’s call!

– – – – – – – –

The Woolly Worm (Woolly Bear) is born all-black and the brown band develops as it gets older. A narrower band of brown really only indicates that the caterpillar was born later in spring. Therefore the only thing it “predicts” is how long winter lasted last winter! The caterpillars which are still all-black in the Fall are a different species entirely, and don’t count for weather prediction.

2 comments

  1. Much enjoyed, Michael

    “This band on Woolly Bears we see next Fall
    tells us our weather – only last year’s call!”

    Sort of like the weatherman. Some lucky viewer
    receives a gift if the next day’s weather is within
    5 degrees of the forecast.

    Like

  2. Thank you Sarah. I didn’t think about that, the weather forecasters don’t do that too much here. Maybe they figure they be paying off too often.

    Like

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