Raven In A Field

 

 

raven in the filed

Take this patch of meadow

clustered green in clover

and you have a textile

by William Morris. Hidden in its leafage,

the assumption that love is enough —

 

the love of being wild and open,

of flight from anyone or thing

that confines your freedom. And yet

 

is such love enough

as you turn on the edge of evening,

your hair and shawl falling

into a feathery shadow,

 

while the wind fades; and your eyes pin

the intricate stillness with fear?

_________________________________________________

William Morris was a 19th century poet and artist belonging to the Pre-Raphaelite movement. His textiles

of  plants, flowers and birds became famous for their intricacy of detail and color.  He also extended his patterns into wallpaper.  This fancy artwork also appeared in books he published and served as a background for woodcut illustrations.

 

4 comments

  1. “Hidden in its leafage,

    the assumption that love is enough —”

    Wendy,

    I savor those lines. They please the ears and demand to be said
    again and again. The sounds, the sense, the poetry…Yes!

    …” your eyes pin

    the intricate stillness with fear”

    I love this. You have set the tone so deftly with imagery and sounds,
    and the wisdom that spills from your pen.

    You never disappoint!

    Sarah

    Like

  2. “Hidden in its leafage,
    the assumption that love is enough”

    Wonderful lines!

    And I love that line re the eyes pinning the stillness with fear.

    Always a pleasure to read your work.
    Kerri

    Like

  3. Dear Sarah and Kerri

    So glad you enjoyed this poem; and thank you both so much for your lovely comments! They mean a great deal to me and help to keep me confident in my work and inspired. Please take care,

    my best to you both,
    Wendy

    Like

  4. Just so beautifully written Wendy. I never tire of reading your work. It is always gently wrought and so utterly poetic, (which not all poems are by a long chalk,) And for me, you have quite perfected the art of allusion.

    Douglas.

    Like

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